UNDERSTANDING CONCUSSIONS AND HEAD INJURIES

FACTS

According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the National Center for Injury

Prevention and Control (NCIPC), each year, an estimated 1.7 million people sustain a concussion. A concussion

is also commonly referred to as a traumatic brain injury (TBI). TBI is a contributing factor to a third of all injuryrelated

deaths in the United States. About 75% of TBI’s that occur each year are concussions or other forms of

mild TBI. The other big concern is the number of people with TBI who are not seen in an emergency room or

who receive no care is unknown.

 

WHAT IS A CONCUSSION?

A concussion is a type of traumatic brain injury (TBI) caused by a bump, blow, or jolt to the head that can

change the way your brain normally works. Concussions can also occur from a blow to the body that causes

the head to move rapidly back and forth. Even a “ding,” “getting your bell rung,” or what might seem to be a

mild bump or blow to the head can be serious.

 

HOW TO RECOGNIZE A POSSIBLE CONCUSSION?

To help recognize a concussion, you should watch for the following two things with an athlete:

 A forceful bump, blow, or jolt to the head or body that results in rapid movement of the head. And,

 Any change in the athlete’s behavior, thinking, or physical functioning.

It is suggested that any athlete who experiences any of the following signs and symptoms after a bump, blow,

or jolt to the head or body, be kept out of play the day of the injury and until a health care professional,

experienced in evaluating for concussion, clears the athlete as symptom‐free and able to return to play.

 

Coaching Staff Observations of an Athlete:

It is suggested that any coach who observes any of the following symptoms and/or suspects an athlete has

sustained a concussion, should remove the athlete from practice or game competition and not allow his/her

return until a written clearance is received from a licensed health care provider. Let the parent/guardian know

right away.

 Appears dazed or stunned

 Is confused about an assignment or position

 Forgets an instruction

 Is unsure of the game, score, or opponent

 Moves clumsily

 Answers questions slowly

 Loses consciousness (even if briefly)

 Show mood, behavior, or personality changes

 Can’t recall events prior to hit or fall

 Can’t recall events after hit or fall

 

Symptoms / Observation for Parents, Guardians and Athletes:

Even though most concussions are mild, all concussions are potentially serious and may result in complications

if not recognized and managed properly. Signs and symptoms of a concussion may show up right after the

injury or can take hours or days to fully appear. If you recognize or your athlete reports any of the following

symptoms, seek medical attention right away. Let your team coach know of your findings.

 Headaches or “pressure” to the head

 Nausea or vomiting

 Balance problems or dizziness

 Double or blurry vision

 Sensitivity to light

 Sensitivity to noise

 Feeling sluggish, hazy, fogy or groggy

 Concentration or memory problems

 Confusion

 Doesn’t “feel right” or is “feeling down”

 Show mood, behavior, or personality changes

 Can’t recall events prior to hit or fall

 Can’t recall events after hit or fall

 

ATHLETE TO ATHLETE

Good teammates always watch out for each other. If you see it or recognize it…Report it. Tell your coach if a

teammate shows signs or symptoms of a concussion.

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About Keith Sei

Keith Sei #3 Born Sept 9, 1964 Position: Center Height: 5-9 Weight: 195 Last Team: Franklin Park (U.S. Junior A) Birthplace: Chicago, Illinois (USA) Hometown: Franklin Park, Illinois PRE-DRAFT STATISTICS Year Team League GP G A TP PIM 1981-82 Franklin Park U.S. Jr. A 50 44 46 90 42 PRE-DRAFT AWARDS AND HONORS USA Hockey Gold Cup: 1984 (Franklin Park) Miscellaneous: Played on the Franklin Park Jets independent Junior A team that and stunned the U.S. amateur hockey world by winning the state's first Junior A championship under the name Team Illinois in 1982. The team was also known as the Chicago Jets, which later became its official name. ... Attended East Leyden High School in Franklin Park. NHL CAREER
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